Tom Holland in the Wild... Vanity Fair has given us the first look at Tom's new movie Cherry!...
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11 / 24

Tom Holland in the Wild and Woeful Cherry: Exclusive First Look

Vanity Fair has given us the first look at Tom’s new movie Cherry! The movie is set to release in theaters on February 26 and then globally on Apple TV+ on March 12. Check out the stills!

VANITY FAIR – Cherry is a movie that dares you to try and describe it. It’s the first film that Anthony and Joe Russo have directed following their Avengers finales, Infinity War and Endgame, and it reunites them with Spider-Man star Tom Holland. It also compresses their penchant for large-scale action and cataclysm into the core of a single person.

Holland’s title character is both volatile and vulnerable, a hard-knock nobody from Cleveland who’s just scraping by but doesn’t even have any big dreams to guide him. Every solution to his problems only deepens the trouble: College isn’t working out, so Cherry joins the Army to serve in Iraq as a medic. He returns home haunted and damaged, and starts abusing opioids to blunt his PTSD. To pay for the drugs, he resorts to bank robbery. The more desperate he gets, the more banks he has to rob.

Every step is a step down, a progression into the abyss you can see in these images from Vanity Fair’s exclusive first look.

It’s tempting to call this film, which hits theaters first on February 26 and then premieres globally on Apple TV+ on March 12, a smaller, more intimate project from the brothers who made some of Marvel’s most grandiose films. It’s definitely a passion project for them. But Cherry is also a sprawling tale that ventures around the world, albeit locked within the mind of Holland’s sweet-natured, grimly addicted bandit.

“We do think about it as an epic film, and it is very much a person’s life journey,” said Anthony Russo. “But it does have a little bit of a split personality between being this character study and an epic life cycle.”

They described Cherry as six movies in one, spanning from the mid 2000s to the present. “He travels a great distance over a 15-year period,” Joe Russo said. “The movie’s broken up into six chapters that reflect those different periods, and each one has a different tone. It’s shot with different lenses, different production design. One’s got magical realism. Another chapter is absurdism. Another is horror…There’s a bit of gonzo in it. It’s raw in its tone. He’s a character in existential crisis.”

Based on the 2018 novel by Nico Walker, the screenplay was written by the filmmakers’ sister, Angela Russo-Otstot (V, The Shield), and Jessica Goldberg (The Path). “The book was very, very self-aware, self-deprecating, and self-loathing,” Joe said.

They felt a strong connection, even if the story doesn’t necessarily mirror their own. It’s close enough: “We’re from Cleveland and Nico’s from Cleveland. Interestingly enough, we know a lot of people that are implied in the book,” Joe added. “I think he’s fictionalized names and personalities. But I worked at the same restaurant that Nico worked at, 10 years apart. So he had a very similar upbringing to us. He just had a very different journey than we did.”
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08 / 05

The Devil All The Time: Tom Holland Takes On His Darkest Film Yet

We have another new production still of Tom from The Devil All The Time!

EMPIRE – In recent years, Tom Holland has dominated the big screen as the MCU’s Spider-Man – a charming, witty incarnation of Peter Parker with a youth and vitality that sets him apart from the rest of the Marvel roster. But in the likes of The Impossible and The Lost City Of Z, he’s also headed into more dramatic territory – and he’s about to appear in a film that’s as far removed from the Marvel universe as anything he’s done. Holland leads Antonio Campos’ upcoming psychological thriller The Devil All The Time – a sprawling, decade-spanning, multi-generational tale about the trauma of war – coming soon to Netflix, and based on Donald Ray Pollock’s acclaimed novel.

Holland plays Arvin Russell, the son of troubled World War II veteran Willard Russell (played by IT star Bill Skarsgård) – and he’s part of a tapestry of characters that elsewhere takes in Robert Pattinson as an unsettling preacher, Sebastian Stan as a cop, and Jason Clarke and Riley Keough as a pair of loved-up serial killers. Speaking to Empire in the Ultimate Movie Playlist issue, Campos was impressed at how Holland immersed himself in a very different kind of movie.“I don’t believe he does anything without diving headfirst into it and giving himself completely over to it,” he says.

As the disparate stories start to weave together, the film delves into some unsettling territory in an exploration of PTSD, violence and faith. “There are dark things that happen,” says Campos. “But I think that experiencing darkness is not a bad thing when it’s done in the right context. The film is not glorifying violence; it’s trying to understand where it comes from. It’s trying to understand its connection – especially in this country – to faith, and people abusing the power of faith.”

08 / 03

First Look at Tom in The Devil All the Time

Entertainment Weekly has given us the first look at Tom in his upcoming film The Devil All the Time. The film will be released September 16 on Netflix.

Netflix drama The Devil All the Time is the new movie from filmmaker Antonio Campos (Simon Killer, 2016’s Christine) and is based on novelist Donald Ray Pollock’s 2011 family saga of the same name. “It’s a multi-strand narrative set between the end of World War II and the beginning of America’s involvement in Vietnam in which a motley group of characters’ lives all intersect,” says the director.

If Campos is a little secretive about the nature of the film’s plot there is no hiding the star-studded nature of the cast, which includes Bill Skarsgård, Riley Keough, Jason Clarke, Sebastian Stan, Haley Bennett, Mia Wasikowska, Eliza Scanlen, Robert Pattinson, and Tom Holland, who plays the movie’s central, and troubled, character, Arvin Russell.

“I was really eager to work with Antonio because his previous films that I’ve seen are very raw,” says Holland. “I guess it was the challenge of doing a different accent, playing the rural kid, a period film, a new director. Everything ticked the boxes for me.”

“Tom is a very sweet person and a very generous actor but he’s willing to go wherever he needs to go emotionally for the character,” says Campos. “He wanted to go where he had to go. Tom’s electric. He’s sort of sitting there doing nothing and is immensely watchable.”

Robert Pattinson, meanwhile, plays a preacher named Preston Teagardin.

“Rob prepared a bunch of ideas and you don’t know what you’re going to get but it’s all interesting,” says Campos. “The character coming to life — I saw that in front of me when we were on set.”

Although the movie is in large part set in rural Ohio, the director shot the film in Alabama.
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