‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ Los... Yesterday was the Los Angeles premiere of Spider-Man: No Way Home! Tom looked...
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11 / 17

(Video) Tom Holland’s $1.2M Shopping Spree | GQ

GQ’s Man of the Year Tom Holland has an infinite amount of fake money to spend shopping online. GQ curated a personalized shopping list for Tom filled with exotic trips, action figures, homes, sporting events, and more. Who is he taking to Japan with him? How much would he pay to go to the 2022 Champions League Final? Is he ready to add a Funko Pop of himself to his collection?

11 / 17

Tom Holland Is In the Center of the Web

GQ MAGAZINE – “This is going to sound like complete bullshit, but I swear to you that this is true,” Tom Holland says. “Have you ever heard of cognitive dreaming?”

We’ve been talking for a couple of hours at this point, and conversation—as it tends to, after long enough—has drifted onto the subject of dreams. I’ve been having nightmares lately, I tell him. Anxiety. This is something Tom Holland knows all about. He is a terrible sleeper; a sleepwalker; a sleep undresser, even. (“Four out of 10 sleeps I wake up completely naked.”) As it happens, he has a trick for dealing with nightmares, and because Tom Holland is Tom Holland—the actor who put the friendly back into your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man and is just famously, energetically, irresistibly nice—of course he’s happy to help.

“Okay, so I’ll tell you how you do it. Essentially, when you’re asleep, your brain is working way faster than it is when it’s awake. Jon Watts [Holland’s director on three Spider-Man movies] told me this, and it has worked. If you’re in a dream and you read something, say, a stop sign, and you turn around, when you look back at the stop sign it will have changed. So what you do is—and this is where it sounds stupid—you set an alarm for every hour of the day when you’re awake. When the alarm goes off, you read something. So I’m reading—”

At this point Holland looks around his bedroom, which is sparse, an unmade bed and a half-open wardrobe behind him, low fall sun streaming in the window, and alights upon a packet of pistachios. “—Roasted and salted. You turn away, you look back at it: Roasted and salted. Okay, I’m not dreaming. What happens is when you do it for a long time, you start to do that in your sleep. Sometimes, if I’m having a really bad dream, I’ll look at a sign and go, ‘Oh, I’m dreaming.’ And then you have free rein to do whatever you want.”

“Yeah. The last time it happened to me, I was flying around the Golden Gate Bridge. It was awesome.”

Holland is at home in London, waiting out a government-mandated travel quarantine, so for now we’re talking over Zoom. It’s an unusual time for the actor, a rare pause. Since he landed the part six years ago, Holland has played Spider-Man in five movies, of which four have made more than a billion dollars each. In the past year or so he has starred in three films, taking on the offbeat dramatic roles of a priest-murdering orphan in The Devil All the Time and a heroin-addicted bank robber in Cherry, and finished shooting two more. Still somehow only 25, Holland has ascended to a tier of stardom few actors ever reach, and rarely so young. “There are very few actors working now who are versatile in the way that he is,” says Spider-Man producer and former Sony chairperson Amy Pascal. “And he’s the hardest-working person that I know.”

“Since I got cast as Spider-Man, I haven’t really taken a break,” Holland says. So he’s enjoying some state-enforced time to himself. “I find myself ringing my dad [Dominic, a comedian and author] for stuff that I should definitely know how to do,” he says. “ ‘Dad, how do I put the washing machine on?’ ” Last night a skylight broke in bad weather, flooding his kitchen. The outside world has a way of forcing itself back in.

The next few months promise to be hectic even by Holland’s standards. In December he’ll star in Spider-Man: No Way Home, a film that Holland himself has called “the most ambitious stand-alone superhero movie ever made.” Then there is February’s Uncharted, a slick, *Indiana Jones–*y adaptation of the best-selling PlayStation franchise. “This is that moment of, like, ‘Can Tom Holland stand up on his own and be a leading man?’ I know that makes me sound like a dick for saying that,” says Holland. “But for me it is, ‘Can I do it without the Lycra?’ ”

Read more at the source

11 / 17

(Video) SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME – Official Trailer

The official trailer for “Spider-Man: No Way Home” was released last night! It looks so good! Check it out below. The film will release exclusively in theaters December 17.

08 / 24

‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ Official Teaser Trailer

Hello Tom fans.. we finally have the official teaser trailer for Spider-Man: No Way Home. It looks so good!! I can’t wait. The film releases in theaters on December 17, 2021.

06 / 01

Happy 25th Birthday Tom!

Today is Tom Holland’s 25th birthday! I wanted to wish Tom a very happy birthday! On behalf of Totally Tom Holland and Tom fans around the world, we wanted to wish you a wonderful happy birthday! We are all wishing you another year of happiness, success, joy, health, love, and more. I hope you get to spend it with your friends and family.

In celebration of Tom’s birthday, I have put up some outtakes of Tom from a photoshoot for Entertainment Weekly in 2019 while promoting Spider-Man: Far From Home!

I can’t believe it’s been a year already since the site has launched.. and I still have so much to do and add! I will try working on it soon!

03 / 09

British Vogue’s 2021 Hollywood Portfolio

Tom is featured in British Vogue’s 2021 Hollywood Portfolio for his role in Cherry. He looks so handsome!

BRITISH VOGUE – In a time like no other comes an awards season filled with drama – though not all of it the welcome sort. Uncertainty hovers over the film industry, release schedules continue to wobble, and the look and feel of the imminent BAFTA and Oscar nights – pushed back to April this year – remain in soft focus. And then there are our frequently shuttered cinemas. It’s so hard not to miss them, isn’t it? Friday night, lights going down, the hot new film, a buzz in the air – and then, wonder of wonders, it turns out the hype was spot on. Tears are stolen. Hearts are broken. Minds are changed.

Not that 2021 hasn’t brought its own markers of excellence. With streaming services putting out more traditional cinema fare, we have all come to appreciate the rise of the “phone dropper” – performances so electric, so important, that they have the power to wrest your gaze from the global drama unfolding on the tiny screen in your hand.

The best ones did not let it go. Frances McDormand as a woman lost and found on the fabled highways of America; Viola Davis as the “Mother of the Blues” making her first recordings as the world flits between loving and loathing her power; Steven Yeun as a young father risking it all on Arkansan soil; an unforgettable 24-minute single take of Vanessa Kirby set during a home birth; and 23 more exquisite, poignant and hilarious performances celebrated by Vogue.

The film industry is wounded badly, but its stories continue to nourish, heal and offer escape, even hope. So see them all, on whatever screen you can, while we wait for those cinema lights to fade to magic once again.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“It’s a trick that my first-ever director, Nick Evans, taught me, which is basically to turn your nerves into excitement. Throughout my career, whenever I’ve been nervous for something, I just kind of trick myself into thinking that I’m really excited, and it means that I enjoy everything so much more.”

02 / 26

(Video) Tom Holland Shows Off His Viral Pants-less Look for Virtual Interviews | The Tonight Show

Tom Holland talks about doing press virtually, shooting the next Spider-Man film in Atlanta and his upcoming film Cherry.

02 / 26

Tom Holland on his darkest role yet, and why No Way Home could be his last Spider-Man film

BRITISH GQ – Whether as Marvel’s Spider-Man or heroin addict Cherry in his game-changing new role with the Russo brothers, Tom Holland has been on one high or another since the age of 19. Now, as the business of moviemaking rewrites the rules of topline renown, we ask the face of a ten-figure franchise how he learned to swing with the big dogs and where he plans to land when (and if…) his feet finally hit the ground

The fact that the first few words that tumble out of Tom Holland’s mouth include “dildo”* and “heroin” give me a good indication of how much the 24-year-old ballet dancer from South London has grown out from Spider-Man’s long, elastic shadow since the world last saw his “Peter Tingle” tingle.

Another indication is the emotional and physical pulp Holland found himself in 14 months ago: clucking, sweat-drenched and wide-eyed, with a pair of off-colour Y-fronts around his thighs, on the set of Cherry, an independent film shot in Cleveland, Ohio, and directed by the Russo brothers Anthony and Joe (Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Civil War; Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame), with a screenplay by their sister, Angela Russo-Otstot, and Jessica Goldberg.

Cherry is Holland’s moment to try on his big-boy movie star pants. The ride is wild, traumatic and fist-bitingly raw. The subject matter is distinctly adult: it is a toxic junkie love story, set before and after the Iraq War of 2003.

“Have you ever taken heroin before?” Holland asks me, I assume rhetorically. “Because I have not. I couldn’t sit there on set and inject heroin into my chest – that’s not how it is done. I had to get it right. This role took me to some of the darkest places I have ever been, emotionally, physically, anythingly… I would never go back there again, not for anyone. I am pleased I did it, but that door is now closed and locked.”

For myriad reasons, Holland’s performance in Cherry is astonishing. For almost the entirety of the film you can see – almost feel – the chemicals rattling around in his pale, gasping veins. Yet it’s more Ewan McGregor in Trainspotting, however, than Timothée Chalamet in Beautiful Boy; there’s horror, sure, but there’s also a distinct sense the directors want empathy for their character’s story.

The dude’s skin gets pallid, with all the colourless putridity of raw chicken that’s three days turned. It’s a film in which the demons (and America’s contemporary problems) are stuffed down your throat, via your eyeballs, while Spider-Man’s cherry-red and royal-blue Marvel Cinematic Universe-issued spandex morph suit is entirely absent. Spidey fans will be shocked out of their Butterkist sugar comas.

“I think there might have been some people at Disney confused as to why their Spider-Man had become a heroin addict.” Holland says, chuckling, clearly enjoying the idea that a few of the Disney execs – who bought Marvel in 2009 for a cool $4 billion (£2.4bn) – might be sweating under the lights here a little. Holland, after all, is one of the world’s most valuable stars, if not the most valuable star in the MCU.

The actor is currently talking to me from a rental house in Atlanta, Georgia, where he is shooting Spider-Man: No Way Home. He’s been here since September and “We’re close to finishing, actually”. Today (a Monday) is a good day because it’s Holland’s one day off a week. After talking to me he’ll go to a local golf club with one of his younger brothers – Harry, who has been doubling as his assistant; Holland has two other siblings – and thwack a few irons into the clipped turf in a bid to just forget. To forget who he is and to forget, just for a fleeting moment, the insurmountable pressure that comes with being who he is.

Cherry is an adaptation of author Nico Walker’s literary debut, a (mostly) factual autobiography that tells the story of a smart yet vulnerable man, “Cherry” (Holland), who flees stale suburbia’s all-day bongs, unpaid bills and unemployment boredom by signing up for the US Army and heading promptly into the oil-soaked stench of Iraq. Clue: this turns out to be a massive fucking mistake.

He trains to kill the “Haji” (a derogatory term for an Iraqi, used by US military throughout the 2003 conflict), learns to stuff his comrades’ hot guts back inside their blackened, hollowed chests as an army medic, hauls out to Iraq’s “Triangle Of Death”, waits, masturbates in a Portakabin in the middle of the desert thinking about his beautiful, doe-eyed wife back home in Cleveland (played superbly by Ciara Bravo) and then waits a bit more.

Just as things are getting boring he watches as his marine buddies suffer a direct hit and burn alive in their dust-coloured Humvee, his bunk buddy’s wedding ring shining out from the blackened mass of charred bodies and twisted metal like a crescent moon in a midwinter sky. Experiences like this affect a man.

Returning home, our antihero finds his post-war life utterly shaken by severe PTSD, which, in turn – thanks to US doctors handing out opiates prescriptions like parking tickets at the time – leads to Oxycontin abuse. Cherry’s wife also becomes a slave to the dope. Then they start to inject heroin intravenously and our character makes a decision to fund their spiralling habits with a spree of amateurish, pistol-wielding bank robberies.

Read the rest of the interview at the source

02 / 25

Tom Holland for W Magazine

Tom is featured in W Magazine’s annual Best Performances issue. Check out the photos in the gallery and read the interview below!

W MAGAZINE – Tom Holland had played Spider-Man in three different movies by the Russo brothers when the directors decided to change things up. For what would become the collaborators’ fourth film together, Cherry, the Russos proposed that Holland play a bank-robbing heroin addict. It was a break from the Marvel universe if ever there was one, and the 24-year-old seized his chance. For W’s annual Best Performances issue, Holland reflects on the evolution of his acting career.

What was the first thing you auditioned for?

When I was 8 or 9, I auditioned for every role in Romeo and Juliet, including Juliet, and I didn’t get a single part. When I was 11, I booked Billy Elliot; that was the first job I ever booked. I couldn’t dance, but trainers would come to my school and teach me at lunch. I was at a rugby school, so doing ballet in tights in the school gym wasn’t the coolest of things to do, but it paid off.

Early on, you played rugby. Do you still play?

No. Everyone grew and got really big, and I stayed really small. So I had to find a sport where I wasn’t getting battered all the time. Golf seemed like the most logical decision. I’ve probably been playing for about 10 years. I have more golf outfits than regular clothes.

What was the first movie that you booked?

The Impossible, which is a Juan Antonio Bayona film, and also the first audition I ever had for a film. It was an amazing experience. I got the chance to work with Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts. That was the first time I realized that I could be an actor and it was something that I could do for the rest of my life. I immediately fell in love with the idea of making movies, and was so lucky that afterward people really responded to the film.

In Cherry, you play a lovelorn soldier who becomes a drug addict and robs banks to pay for his heroin. What was the hardest part of portraying this character?

Physically and mentally, the dope life portion of the film is the most demanding. It was really hard to bounce between different versions of my character.

How did you first get involved with the film?

It’s directed by the Russo brothers, whom I’ve obviously worked with many times before in the Marvel universe. They took me aside and told me they were doing this small independent feature. I was really touched that, of all the people they could have worked with, they wanted me to play the lead. They’ve changed my life in so many different ways and continue to look after me, so I owe a lot to the Russos.

What’s the key to doing an American accent? Yours is remarkable in Cherry.

Just hard work, really. I’m very lucky. My dialect coach, Rick Lipton, who goes by Pretty Ricky, is one of my best mates. We’ve been working together for years now—I think we’re coming up on our 10th or 12th movie together. We just put the work in, practice, practice, practice, and get it done.
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02 / 24

#SpiderManNoWayHome​ Teaser!

The new Spider-Man movie will be called Spider-Man: No Way Home and will release December 17, 2021!

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